Religious Days

Historic Calendar, Religious Days, Feasts, Festivals & Sacrifices.

Religious Days

Post Number:#1  Postby mark » Mon Sep 21, 2015 3:29 pm

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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#2  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:11 pm

Vintrnætr
Winter Nights are the traditional festival honouring the Disir or family spirits. It is a time to remember your family, the dead, and your ancestors. A Freyablot may be performed at this time as Freya is known as the Vanadis (i.e. the Dis of the Vanir) or the Great Dis, and she seems to be the Goddess of the Disir themselves. This is connected to Freya's position as recipient of half the battle-slain or her ability with seidhr. One might also simply want to honour the Disir as a whole, or attempt to summon and pour offering to your own family's Dis. A sumbel which toasts ones ancestors and passed on friends would also be in order. If a feast is held, it should be quiet and respectful of the character of the season. Another idea is a silent "mum feast," a custom which is found the world over.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#3  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:12 pm

Jól [Major Sacrifice]

Celebration of the Norse New Year; a festival of twelve nights. This is the most important of all the Norse holidays. On the night of December 20, the god Ingvi Freyr rides over the earth on the back of his shining boar, bringing Light and Love back into the World. Yule signifies the beginning and end of all things; the darkest time (shortest hour of daylight) during the year and the brightest hope re-entering the world. During this festival, the Wild Hunt is at its greatest fervor, and the dead are said to range the Earth in its retinue. The god Odin is the leader of this Wild Ride; charging across the sky on his eight-legged horse, Sleipnir; a very awe-inspiring vision. INorse children would leave their boots out by the hearth on Solstice Eve, filled with hay and sugar, for Sleipnir's journey. In return, Odin would leave them a gift for their kindness.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#4  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:12 pm

Þórrblót
Minor feast honouring Thor, the protector of Midgard. During this time, the height of the Storm season, Thor's power is invoked to drive back the frost Jotuns so that Spring may return to Midgard.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#5  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:13 pm

Dísablót
Festival of the Idises, when the effects of Winter are beginning to lessen and the world prepares itself for Spring. Corresponds to the pagan holiday of Imbolc. Disting is characterized by preparing the land for planting. Disting is the time when the cattle were counted and one's wealth was tallied; thus making it a festival of finance as well. It is said that new calves born during Disting were a sign of great prosperity for the coming year.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#6  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:14 pm

Ostarablót [Major Sacrifice]
Festival of Ostara (Eostre), the Spring Goddess. This is a festival of renewal, rejoicing and fertility, although for most of the Northern People, the forces of Winter are still at full sway. The gift of coloured eggs to one's friends and loved ones is a way of wishing them well for the coming season; a magical ritual of prosperity and fecundity. The rabbit is the symbol of this festival as well because of it's re-emergence during this season, and for its reproductive ability.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#7  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:14 pm

Thrimilci

The festival of Thrimilci, a night both of revelry and darkness. The nine nights of April 22nd to April 30th are venerated as remembrance of the All-father's (Odin) self-sacrifice upon the World Tree Yggdrasil. It was on the ninth night (April 30th) that he beheld the Runes, grasped them, and ritually died for an instant. At that moment, all the light in the nine worlds is extinguished, and utter chaos reigns. At the final stroke of midnight, the light returns in dazzling brilliance, and the bale-fires are lit. On the ninth night, the dead have full sway upon the earth; it is the ending night of the Wild Hunt. May 1st is the festival of Thrimilci; the beginning of Summer. Thrimilci is a festival of joy and fertility, much like Ostara; however, most of the Northern World is finally escaping from the snow at this time.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#8  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:15 pm

Miðsumar [Major Sacrifice]

The summer solstice is second only to Jól in importance to the Norse. This day is sacred to the Goddess Sunna, who is literally the sun, and the Summer Solstice when the power of the Sun is at its height is celebrated. Miðsumar is recognised as the longest day of the year; thus, the year began to age after this time and the days grow progressively shorter in a continuous wheel of life, and the movement of the sun & moon across the seasons.

It is at this time that most foreign trade is conducted, as well as shipping, fishing expeditions, and raiding. Thus, Miðsumar is the festival of power and activity. It is not without its darker side as well, the god Baldur is said to have been sacrificed at this time, but is reborn at Jul; the hero Sigurd was also said to have been slain by treachery at Miðsumar by his blood-brothers Hagan and Gunthur (Gundahar).

Most Miðsumar festivities centre around remaining awake all night long to mark the shortest night of the year, then at sunrise performing the "Greeting of Sunna" and a blót (sacrifice) to her. During the night there is also general merriment, drinking, feasting and great bonfires. A notable custom is the rolling of a (sometimes flaming) wagon wheel down a hill or along the streets to mark the turning of the wheel of the year and the movement of the sun to her highest point in the sky.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#9  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:15 pm

Lithasblót
Shortly after the men have mown the hay it is time to hold the first harvest festival of the year; giving thanks to the goddess Jorð for her bounty. Often alms are given to the unfortunate at this time, or loaves in the shape of the fylfot (the Sun-wheel). Lithasblót has long been associated with ceremonial magic and magical workings.
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Re: Religious Days

Post Number:#10  Postby mark » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:16 pm

Haustblót [Major Sacrifice]
There is a celebration held from the 20th - 21st of September called Haust blót, or the Autumn Sacrifice, the begining of the Autumn Equinox. As the season indicates, this is the time when the days grow shorter and the night and darkness will prevail till the winter times come to an end. This is the time to make festivities around the Fire Element, this is a time where everything becomes more magical and mysterious. This is the time to pray and to thank, to the landvaettir, the spirits of nature, to pray to the ancestors who still look over their descendent. The celebration starts with the sound of the horn, people also pray to the God Freyr and to Freya, the Gods of fertility, because the land itself also needs fertility, it needs to be prepared to be planted again, with need seeds, when the winter comes to an end.
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