Goods & Possessions

Currency, weapons & armour etc

Goods & Possessions

Post Number:#1  Postby mark » Thu Sep 10, 2015 1:37 pm

AVAILABILITY OF GOODS
Save for the few trading towns in Scandinavia, there are no such thing as shops. If you lack something you must either make it yourself, steal it, or wait until the thing (assembly) and hope some itinerant trader has one on offer.If an item is not available at the thing market, it can be placed on order with a trader by requesting that he brings one the next time he travels to the region. A desperate man can even undertake a journey to one of the trade towns in the hope of finding what he wants there.

There is no mass production, each item is individually hand crafted and uniquely decorated. Since folk own so few possessions, stealing an item risks the chance of its recognition by the victim of the crime, or his close friends and family. Looting a dead body is tantamount to broadcasting your guilt if the thief attempts to use or barter the articles in that area. Looting the enemy dead after battle is a different matter, and quite acceptable.

Most items needed for day-to-day survival and comfort are made by people the community or people who need them. Folk living on a stead will often carve their own furniture, sew their own shoes, forge their own metal tools and even build their own ships. It is the specialist items such as fine woven cloth, swords, armour, glassware or jewellery that require a dedicated craftsman to manufacture. These goods are expensive and often hard to locate without the right contacts.

King Olaf Tryggvason’s Saga wrote:The ring-linked coat of strongest mail could not withstand the iron hail,
Though sewed with care and elbow bent, by Norn on its strength intent.
The fire of battle raged around, Odin’s steel shirt flew all unbound!
The earl his ring-mail from him flung, its steel rings on the wet deck rung;
Part of it fell into the sea, a part was kept, a proof to be
How sharp and thick the arrow-flight among the sea-steeds in this fight.’
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Re: Goods & Possessions

Post Number:#2  Postby mark » Thu Sep 10, 2015 2:02 pm

DISPLAYING WEALTH
If a Northman acquires items of great value, such as fine silk clothing or a gold arm ring, wearing such articles can add to his reputation. Thus a warrior dripping with silver, especially silver arm rings, dressed in brightly dyed clothing and bearing a gold inlaid sword would likely have a high reputation compared to a poor karl. A wealthy man either has great luck or the skill to defend himself from others who would strip it from him.

NOTE: Possessing and showing off very valuable items, including mail armour, an inlaid sword, a warship, gold & gem jewellery etc, will given a Deepening to a reputation. Losing those items will cause a Waning of reputation.
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Re: Goods & Possessions

Post Number:#3  Postby mark » Thu Sep 10, 2015 2:05 pm

CLOTHING
Norse clothing is a simple, yet practical, combination of tunics and trews for men and apron dresses for women, with socks and shoes of various types. In colder months or during bad weather, several layers of tunics are often worn to keep warm. Additional protection is provided by woollen gloves and leather over-mittens for the hands, extra thick woollen socks, grass stuffed felt boots, hoods, coats and waterproofed cloaks.

The fabrics used for clothing are primarily woollen textiles, with a soft feel due to the type of wool used and weaving techniques. Linens are often imported from regions like England but due to expense are generally reserved for under-tunics or under-dresses. Silk is extraordinarily expensive, imported from Byzantium where it costs more than its own weight in gold. Fortunately silk is light and a little goes a long way.

Woollen or silk fabrics take dye easily and a broad range of muted colours are available. Red from madder; blue from woad; yellow from weld or onion skins; purple from lichens; and greens from over-dyeing yellow with blue. A very dark brownish-black can be produced from walnut shells and iron.

The following garments come with a level of decoration and in a range of colours relative to their quality. Cheap clothes are usually plain and available in brown and grey, or without dye. Reasonable clothes have modest decorations and are available in blue, green, grey, brown, and black. Superior clothes are well decorated and available in red, crimson, yellow, blue, green, grey, brown, and black.

Clothing.png

NOTE: This table reproduces and supplements the table found on page 89 of the Core Rules Book. Either table may be used.
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Re: Goods & Possessions

Post Number:#4  Postby mark » Sun Sep 13, 2015 11:22 pm

JEWELLERY
Norse jewellery began rather plainly – with unadorned bands and rings – but has quickly developed into intricate and masterful artistry, with a strong preference for silver. The two methods most used by the Norse are filigree and repoussé. The main themes in their jewellery are patterns of nature and animals, with increasing abstraction as the years pass and sometimes simplistic geometric patterns. Germanic and Baltic jewellery was very similar to that of the Scandinavians, having many of the same themes, geometric and abstract patterns. Like other European women, Norse women need jewellery to keep their clothes on, and are rarely seen without it as it means you always carry your valuables with you.

Jewellery Table.png


NOTE: Price represent jewellery without any gemstones.
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Re: Goods & Possessions

Post Number:#5  Postby mark » Wed Sep 16, 2015 1:24 pm

GEMSTONES

Gemstones.png


AMBER
Amber holds mystical significance for a number of ancient civilizations including the Norse. Amber's properties, its warmth, its scent when burned and its range of sunny colours, mean the Northmen associate it with sunlight and life. Aside from its mystical significance, amber's beauty also made it valuable. The resinous organic substance is softer than most gems; stone, bone and bronze tools can easily shape it. Northmen are often buried with jewellery that contain at least a few amber beads.

AMETHYST
Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewellery. The name comes from the Ancient Greek ἀ a- ("not") and μέθυστος méthystos ("intoxicated"), a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness. The ancient Greeks wore amethyst and made drinking vessels decorated with it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication. It is one of several forms of quartz. Amethyst is a semiprecious stone and is the traditional birthstone for February. It is more highly prized than most colourless rock crystal (quartz), and is occasionally imported from Byzantium to be used in European and Scandinavian jewellery.

AQUAMARINE
Aquamarine (from Latin: aqua marina, "water of the sea") is a blue or cyan variety of beryl, a gemstone mainly found in granite rocks.

CARNELIAN
Carnelian is a brownish-red mineral which is commonly used as a semi-precious gemstone. Similar to carnelian is sard, which is generally harder and darker, however, the difference is not rigidly defined, and the two names are often used interchangeably.

CORAL
Gifts from the sea were especially valuable to this seafaring culture, and precious coral was no exception. The Norse use pale red coral along with white bone and horn for bead necklaces and smaller inlays. Coral beads adorned woven wire jewellery. Artisans sometimes carve abstract patterns of lines and squares into larger pieces of coral.

DIAMOND
The name diamond is derived from the ancient Greek αδάμας (adámas), "proper", "unalterable", "unbreakable", "untamed", from ἀ- (a-), "un-" + δαμάω (damáō), "I overpower", "I tame". Diamonds mined in the very far east for many millennia and are traded with Byzantium. Diamonds are treasured as gemstones, although they are not the most sought after, but their usage as engraving tools keeps their price high.

EMERALD
Emerald is green coloured gemstone, it is very desirably and expensive. Emeralds have been mined in Egypt and India for over a millennia.

GARNET
Norse warriors and sailors believe that blood-red garnets improved the wearer's fighting prowess, perhaps it does. Craftsmen use the deep red stone extensively as inlays in sword pommels and on armour details. Not only the Norse, but also the Anglo-Saxon's nobles desired expertly polished and fitted garnet inlays in lavish gold treasures. Although gem-quality garnet is native neither to Scandinavian home nor to England, the Norse used the stone extensively.

GLASS
Simple, cut and polished coloured glass beads were often mixed with other semi-precious gemstones to make a more humble type of everyday jewellery. A necklace made of the finest of these can be remarkably desirable.

JET
Jet is a type of lignite, a precursor to coal, and is considered to be a minor gemstone. Jet is not considered a true mineral, but rather a mineraloid as it has an organic origin, being derived from decaying wood under extreme pressure. Jet is either black or dark brown, but may contain pyrite inclusions, which are of brassy colour and metallic lustre. The adjective "jet-black", meaning as dark a black as possible, derives from this material. Jet is found in Germania and Englaland and has been used for many millennia.

LAPIS LAZULI
Lapis lazuli /ˈlæpɪs ləˈzuːliː/ or /-ˈlæʒuːlaɪ/, or lapis for short, is a deep blue semi-precious stone that has been prized since antiquity for its intense colour. Lapis lazuli has been mined in the very distant east and exported to the Mediterranean world and South Asia for millennia, however, it rarely makes it way to Europe or Scandinavia.

PEARL
The Norse are renowned seafarers, so these gems from the sea hold special value for them. Pearls' beauty and rarity make them valuable to their contemporaries as well. These highly esteemed, naturally-formed gems are 'priceless'.

ROCK CRYSTAL
Rock Crystal is the name given to all clear colourless quartz and is one of the least expensive gemstones. Rock crystal lacks the fire, colour and the rarity to be ranked as a fine precious gemstone. None-the-less, rock crystal is in wide use as a gemstone due to its beauty, affordability, availability, and ease of cutting.

RUBY
A ruby is a very hard, pink to blood-red coloured gemstone. Its name comes from ruber, Latin for red. Ruby is considered one of the most precious stones and is only available via import from Byzantium where it is traded from the far east. It is about as desirable as garnet and similarly expensive, although garnets tend to be more commonly available in Scandinavia and the British Isles.

SAPPHIRE
Sapphire is one of the most precious and valuable blue gemstones. It is a very desirable gemstone due to its excellent color, hardness, durability, and lustre. Only diamonds are harder. It is only available via import from Byzantium where it is traded from the far east and is not commonly found in Europe of Scandinavia.
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